Matta

Setumbu Hills / Punthuk Setumbu

Setumbu Hills / Punthuk Setumbu

Setumbu Hills / Punthuk Setumbu

Setumbu Hill is the name of a plateau situated around 4 km west of Borobudur temple. It is the best location to enjoy the Borobudur sunrise from an elevation of about 400 m above the sea level.

When you plan to travel to Yogyakarta or Magelang, visiting Borobudur temple is one of the best option to do. But now, there is a new way to enjoy the magnificent of Borobudur temple from a different angle. alternatively, you can enjoy sunrise from Punthuk Setumbu / Setumbu Hills. Early in the morning, you can witness the mystical Borobudur’s shape with two mountains beside it (Mt. Merapi & Mt. Merbabu), the ray of sunrise the break through the mist that covering the whole area of Borobudur and its surrounding, while you can hear the birds sing. Calm and peaceful atmosphere that you’ll never want to miss.

All you need to do is to decide the best time to visit it and your sacrifice to wake up early in the morning to catch the time before sunrise. To see the sunrise is not 100% possible in rainy season. Thus, do not expect to see a full sunrise when you go there at the rainy day. What exactly you would see is clouds with orange skyline. However, it is still lovely. The claiming goes, it is the trip that matters.

The main catch is not just the sunrise, but the hazy Borobudur that gradually discloses itself out from the misty forested Magelang area. Lots of visitors who went there to see sunrise were not realize, the main attraction is to see Borobudur reveals its bell-shape out of the forest shrouded in the fog.

 

To catch the top of the Punthuk Setumbu hill, you need to do a little bit trekking on foot. Just do a quick walk,  no need to run, just enjoy the fresh air along the way. With that pace, you can reach to the top in less than 15 minutes. Far in the east, Borobudur temple will be seen like floating on the cloud. Although in reality it just covered by some thin mist. The view of the sunrise with Borobudur, Mount Merbabu and Mount Merapi in the distance is a great reward for waking up so early.

 

The Adventure in Instagramable Lands Above the Clouds in Jogja

The Adventure in Instagramable Lands Above the Clouds in Jogja

The Adventure in Instagramable Lands Above the Clouds in Jogja

Jogja – Yogyakarta known for its endless attractions and appeal. Many say that a single visit to Jogja is never enough. The list of things you can experience in Jogja may seem overwhelming, ranging from natural splendors, art, tradition, and heritages.

Lately, if you see Instagram feeds related to Jogja tourism, the city is now decorated with wonderful new attractions that will bring you to the most spectacular sights of its picturesque nature. Especially the newly constructed viewpoints / viewing decks that hype among selfie seekers and photography hunters today. Make you feel as if you are on the land above the clouds. Those places offer dramatic as well as romantic above the clouds views that are so Instagrammable.

So, we will show you a list of “lands above the clouds” that are Instagram-worthy places and budget breakdown when you are visiting Jogja, or planning to go to Jogja.

Jurang Tembelan Kanigoro

Just about a 40-minute drive from the city, Jurang Tembelan / Tembelan Cliff is in the area of Mangunan Hill, near Mangunan Orchard. The place has a ship shaped viewing deck made of bamboo, giving the illusion of floating above the curvy flow of Oya River. The best time to photograph Jurang Tembelan is at sunrise, the mist that covered Oya River will look so dramatic.  But you can also enjoy the sunset here.

Bukit Panguk Kediwung

About 2 km away from Mangunan Orchard, Panguk Kediwung Hill is within the same area as the Dlingo Pine Forest (Hutan Pinus Dlingo). It is one of the best places to enjoy the sunrise and enchanting wide expanse of greenery. Surely you’ll never want to miss taking a selfie at this spot.

Puncak Becici

Judging from a number of photos on Instagram, this spot is very popular for those looking for a memorable place to record their holiday memories. Puncak Becici / Becici Peak has gained more world’s popularity since the visit of the 44th US President, Barack Obama and his family. Located in Gunung Mutuk Village, it is undoubtable a nice place to watch sunset, wondrous natural sceneries, Mt Merapi and Sindoro.

Kalibiru

Kalibiru is a viewing deck where you can see Sermo Reservoir from above and Indian Ocean. In the area of Kalibiru National Park in Kulonprogo, this place is a perfect spot for taking unique selfie photos

Nglanggeran Ancient Volcano

An active volcano 20 million years ago, this place is now an exotic place to see dazzling sunrise to sunset and sparkling Jogja at night from above. To reach Nglanggeran Ancient Volcano’s top, you need to take an hour to 90 minutes trekking. This place is dedicated for outdoor activities such as camping, rock climbing, or flying fox.

Breksi Cliff

You can get to the top of the Breksi cliff to see a nice view of Yogyakarta city on the west side, Mount Merapi and Candi Prambanan on the north side, and Candi Ijo on the east side. You can also enjoy the nice sunrise and sunset view on the top of it. Breksi Cliff is located in Sambirejo Village, just in the same area with Queen Boko Palace and for about 3 km away from Candi Prambanan.

Punthuk Setumbu

Setumbu Hill is the name of a plateau situated around 4 km west of Borobudur temple. It is the best location to enjoy the Borobudur sunrise from an elevation of about 400 m above the sea level. Here, you can witness the mystical Borobudur’s shape with two mountains beside it (Mt. Merapi & Mt. Merbabu), the ray of sunrise breaks through the mist that covers the whole area of Borobudur and its surrounding.

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Borobudur Temple

Borobudur Temple

Borobudur Temple

For centuries, Borobodur laid hidden under layers of volcanic ash. The reasons behind the desertion of this magnificent monument still remain a mystery.

There is no written record of who built Borobudur or of its intended purpose. The construction time has been estimated by comparison between carved reliefs on the temple’s hidden foot and the inscriptions commonly used in royal charters during the eight and ninth centuries. Borobudur was likely founded around 750 AD. This corresponds to the peak of the Syailendra dynasty in central Java (760–830 AD), when it was under the influence of the Srivijaya Empire. The construction has been estimated to have taken 75 years and been completed during the reign of Samaratungga in 825.

For centuries, Borobodur laid hidden under layers of volcanic ash. The reasons behind the desertion of this magnificent monument still remain a mystery. Some scholars believe that the famine was caused by the eruption of Mount Merapi that forced the inhabitants of Central Java to leave their lands behind in search of a new place to live. When people once again inhabited this area, the glory of Borobudur was buried by ash from Mount Merapi.

Borobudur was rediscovered in 1814 by Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles who, during his visit in Semarang, received a report indicating the discovery of a hill full of many carved stones. The hill was believed by the local inhabitants to be the site of an ancient monument called budur. Raffles then commissioned a team led by Cornelius to investigate the hill.

It was in 1835 that the site was cleared. Some efforts were made to restore and preserve the colossal monument since then. Unfortunately, in 1896 the Dutch colonial government gave away eight containers of Borobudur stones, including reliefs, statues, stairs and gates, as presents for the King of Siam who was visiting Indonesia.

A restoration program undertaken between 1973 and 1984 returned much of the complex to its former glory, and the site has since become a destination of Buddhist pilgrimage. On January 21, 1985 the temple suffered minor damage due to a bomb attack. In 1991, Borobudur was listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Viewed from above, Borobudur takes the form of a giant mandala, symbolically depicting the path of the bodhisattva from samsara to nirvana, through the story of Sudhana described in the Gandavyuha Sutra, a part of the Avatamsaka Sutra. In total, this massive monument contains over 2 million stone blocks.

Some scholars think that this massive monument is a gigantic textbook of Buddhism to help people to achieve enlightenment. To read this Buddhist textbook in stone requires a walk of more than two miles. The walls of the galleries are adorned with impressive reliefs illustrating the life of Buddha Shakyamuni and the principles of his teaching.

Representing the existence of the universe, Borobudur perfectly reflects the Buddhist cosmology, which divides the universe into three intermingled separate levels. The three levels are Kamadhatu (world of desire), Ruphadatu (world of forms), and Arupadhatu (world of formlessness).

The hidden base of Borobudur was originally the first level, which contains the gallery of Kamadhatu level. It is thought that during construction Borobudur experienced a landfall that threatened the entire building. To prevent the whole monument from collapsing, the Kamadhatu level was closed and made into a new base that holds Borobudur steady.

This level of Kamadhatu pictures the world of passion and the inevitable laws of karma. The first 117 panels show various actions leading to one and the same result, while the other remaining 43 panels demonstrate the many results that follow one single effect. At least 160 relief panels were carved around this level, based on the manuscript of Karmavibhangga. What is left of these can be seen in the Southeast corner of this level.

The reliefs of the Rupadhatu level show the stories based on the manuscripts of Lalitavistara, Jataka-Avadana and Gandavyuha. The Lalitavistara reliefs, consisting of 120 panels, tell us about the life of Siddhartha Gautama Buddha. It starts with the glorious descent of Buddha from the Tushita heaven. Born as Prince Siddhartha, Buddha’s childhood was isolated from the outside world’s misery. Accidentally witnessing the misery of sickness, decrepitude and death, young Prince Siddharta decided to escape from the worldly life and commencing his search of freedom from suffering. Siddhartha’s long and painful search finally led him to the highest level of enlightenment and made him Buddha, the Enlightened One. This story ends with Buddha’s sermon in the Deer Park near Benares.

The Jataka is a collection of stories about Buddha’s previous reincarnation, chains and virtues. According to the Jataka, Buddha was born 504 times before being born as Prince Siddharta, taking on the forms of god, kings, princes, learned men, thieves, slaves, and a gambler. Many times he was born in the forms of animals such as lion, deer, monkey, swan, big turtle, quail, horse, bird and many others. But the Boddhisatva (Buddha-to-be) was distinguished from all other kings, slaves, or animals among whom he lived. The Boddhisatva is always superior and wiser than those around him.

As to the relief of Avadana, the main figure is not the Buddha himself. All the saintly deeds pictured in this part are attributed to other legendary characters. The stories are compiled in Dvijavadana (Glorious Heavenly Acts) and the Avadana Sataka (The Hundred Avadana). The first 20 frames in the lower series of stories on the first gallery depict the Sudhanakumaravana.

The series of reliefs covering the wall of the second gallery is dedicated to Sudhana’s tireless wandering during his search for the highest wisdom. The story is continued on the walls and balustrades of the third and fourth galleries. Most of the 460 panels depict the scenes based on the Mahayana text Gandavyuha, while the concluding scenes are derived from the text of Badracari.


Pictures from https://matta-tour.com/site/2016/06/07/borobudur/

Nusa Penida, A Heavenly Beach Words Can’t Describe

Nusa Penida, A Heavenly Beach Words Can’t Describe

Nusa Penida
A Heavenly Beach Words Can’t Describe

Nusa Penida, Bali – Just about a 40 minutes boat ride towards the southeast of Bali island, Nusa Penida offers you a perfect hideaway and world-famous diving and snorkeling spots.

Get a little bored of Bali, hate the massive crowds and jams that seem to be everywhere lately? Bali may be a great place to kick back and relax, but do remember that the world is your oyster, and there are always many more places to explore.

Just about a 40 minutes boat ride from Sanur harbor towards the southeast of Bali island, Nusa Penida is waiting for you. Totaling for 200 square kilometers, Nusa Penida is much larger than the other two islands near Bali, the touristy Nusa Lembongan and Nusa Ceningan. Traveling to Nusa Penida is like traveling back in time. You will find yourself in the middle of a sleepy slow rhythm fishing village life. The beach, which extends as far as the eye can see, is perfectly beautiful.

Nusa Penida is best known for Manta rays and Mola-mola giant sunfish, the diving, snorkeling, scuba here is actually great, both in terms of corals and marine life. Divers and snorkelers will get the unique opportunity to swim with giant Manta rays, you might even lay your eyes on the monstrous Mola-mola sunfish if you’re lucky.

HIGHLIGHTS:

Crystal Bay

A stunning white sandy beach at Banjar Penida, west of Sakti village on the north-western coast facing Nusa Ceningan. Perfect crystal-clear waters and excellent snorkeling spot. The snorkeling here is considered one of the best on the island due to its clarity, crystal-clear water. During the summer, Mola-mola are often spotted here.

Bukit Molenteng / Molenteng Hills

Dubbed by the visitors as Raja Ampat of Bali, Molenteng Hill is precisely located at Pelilitan hamlet, Pejukutan. It offers beautiful Hindia Ocean view, Atuh Beach, and a tree house on the cliff top that give satisfaction to lovers of natural beauty. Molenteng was taken from the local language “kamol” (farm) because a long time ago, it used to be a corn farm all along the hills.

Atuh Beach

Atuh Beach is located in Pejukutan Village, Klungkung Regency. It has one of the most striking views you can ever imagine. Here you will find the shimmering turquoise waters juxtaposed against craggy mountain peaks, and stretches of white sands laid out perfectly in the curved beach. A photographer’s delight.

Angel’s Billabong & Broken Beach (Pasih Uuh Beach)

Broken Beach gives you stunning views from cliff tops that show off the natural hole. Watch from above as the water comes in with the tide, it has a small beach but this cannot be accessed by land. A great place to take photos and giant mantas can sometimes be seen swimming in the sea below. Angel billabong is about 200 meters away, it is a natural infinity pool. You can enter the infinity pool at low tide, but for safety reasons please do not enter at high tide when waves are crashing over the edge.

Toyapakeh

Toyapakeh means salt water in Balinese and is the richest diving site in Nusa Penida. It is a divers’ favorite as you often find various colorful fish, including the red tooth triggerfish, giant trevallies and batfish, pygmy seahorse, hammerhead sharks, Manta rays and Mola-mola. The density of coral, sponge and marine life is incredible here.

Gamat Bay

Gamat Bay is a tiny bay in this Island, it is where the Gamat River ends. Precisely, it is located in Toyapakeh channel and directly in contact with Nusa Ceningan. This site is well known among local divers in Bali but also safe for snorkeling activity. It has crystal-clear water, large amounts of stranded colorful corals decorating the seaside, and various marine life.

Kelingking Cliff Secret Point Beach

Kelingking Cliff view point is said as the most photogenic spot in the island. This entire coastal area is particularly beautiful, the white cliffs contrast dramatically with the turquoise blue waters. The cliffs formed in the shape of a Tyrannosaurus Rex at Kelingking Secret Point Beach are bound to be a crowd favorite.

Bali Bird Sanctuary

The Friends of the National Parks Foundation has set up a bird sanctuary on Nusa Penida, and its two sister islands, where many endangered Indonesian bird species are given a new lease of life and protection from poachers. Check out the sanctuary to catch a glimpse of some of the rarest birds in the world, including the Bali Starling – the second rarest type of bird in the world.

Giri Putri Cave Temple

Giri Putri Cave Temple in Nusa Penida is not just a regular temple. It Is located inside a cave, and you’ll even have to crawl through a 2-meter long tunnel to get inside. The temple is located in the Suana village, Karangsari, 10 kilometres east from the main harbor.

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Pictures from https://matta-tour.com/site/2017/08/03/nusa-penida-heavenly-beaches-words-cant-describe/

Prambanan Temple

Prambanan Temple

Prambanan Temple

Prambanan Temple is said to be the most beautiful Hindu temple in the world. It is the biggest temple complex in Java with three main temples dedicated to the three great Hindu deities; Shiva, Vishnu, and Brahma (the symbols of Trimurti in Hindu belief).

Prambanan Temple is said to be the most beautiful Hindu temple in the world. It is the biggest temple complex in Java with three main temples dedicated to the three great Hindu’s deities; Shiva, Vishnu, and Brahma (the symbols of Trimurti in Hindu’s belief).

According to the history, Rakai Pikatan, a Hindu prince from Sanjaya Dynasty, who had married into the ruling Buddhist Syailendra monarchy built all the temples in the area in the 8th century AD. In its original form, the temple complex contained over 250 large and small temples. The temple compound was expanded by successor of Mataram kings with hundreds of Perwara temples around the central temples. It served as the royal temple of the Kingdom of Mataram for religious ceremonies and sacrifices. However, in the 10th century the temple was largely abandoned because the Mataram dynasty moved to East Java. Then, it collapsed during a major earthquake in the 16th century.

Also locally known as Roro Jonggrang, legend has it that the 1,000th statue of the temple was the statue of a slender virgin lady named Roro Jonggrang, who turned into stone by a young and powerful man named Bandung Bondowoso after her attempt to thwart Bondowoso’s effort in building a thousand temples and two wells in one night for the lady failed. Bondowoso was in love with Roro Jonggrang and asked her to marry him. However, Roro Jonggrang was full of hatred because Bondowoso killed her father; hence she tried to refuse his proposal by asking him a seemingly impossible task. As a man who had unseen troop of spirits, it was easy for Bondowoso to finish the task. After nearly a thousand temples had been built, Roro Jonggrang asked the villagers to pound rice and to set a fire in order to look like the morning had broken. This way, the spirits had no choice but left before completing the last one temple. Bondowoso realised that the lady had cheated him so he turned Roro Jonggrang into the 1,000th statue. This is a very interesting folklore that local people love to share.

In 1811, a surveyor working for Sir Thomas Stamford Raffles found the ruins of Prambanan by pure chance, yet, they were not long enough in Java to do much about it and the temple remained neglected for decades. Dutch residents started to loot the reliefs to adorn their garden with priceless statues while local people were taking the foundation stones and using them as construction material. It was in 1930 that the proper restoration began and continues to this day.

In 1991, UNESCO listed Prambanan Temple Compound as World Cultural Heritage.

The high structures are typical of Hindu architecture, and the plan of the temple complex is a Mandala, as is Borobudur. As a symbol of the Hindu cosmos, the temple is vertically divided into three parts, both vertically and in plan.

Bhurloka

The base of the temples, as well as the outer square is the underworld. It was a large space marked by a rectangular wall. This is a place for ordinary folk, mortals, both human and animal. This is the place where lust and desire are commonplace. It is an unholy area.

Bhuvarloka

The central body of the temples and the middle square of the complex, represents the ‘middle world’ the place for those who have left their worldly possessions. This is where people begin to see the light of truth. The middle world had four rows of 224 small individual shrines, where all shrines are identical.

Svarloka

The top of the temples and the innermost square represents the realm of the gods, the holiest zone, and is crowned. Three 16 temples that consist of 3 main temples: Brahma the Creator, Shiva the Destroyer, and Vishnu the Keeper. Shiva temple is the biggest and the tallest amongst all with 47.6m high, while Brahma and Vishnu are 33m high. In addition to the three main temples, there are three Wahana Temples, four Kelir Temples, two Apit Temples and four Patok Temples.

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Pictures from : https://matta-tour.com/site/2016/06/02/prambanan/

Mekare-kare: Balinese Men’s Pandan Battle to Honor The God of War

Mekare-kare: Balinese Men’s Pandan Battle to Honor The God of War

Mekare-kare: Balinese Men’s
Pandan Battle to Honor The God of War

Surakarta, or commonly called Solo, is one of the most famous batik central in Indonesia. Two famous Batik villages in Solo that having long history of Batik, Laweyan Batik Village and Kauman Batik Village offer you a lot to admire.

Karangasem is one of the most touristic destinations in Bali which still preserved their ancestor’s traditions. One of the unique ceremonies found in Tenganan village, Karangasem, is Perang Pandan. Tenganan is also one of the oldest villages in Bali which is locally known as “Bali Aga”.

Perang Pandan (Pandan Battle) War Dance, or locally known as “mekare-kare” or “megeret pandan”, at Tenganan village is held annually at “Sasih Kalima” (fifth month of the Balinese/Caka calendar). It is carried out during the ceremony called “Ngusaba” at the yard of the village’s temple, dedicated to the god of war – Indra.

Tengananese men dress in traditional clothing with bare chest and headband (udeng), use thorny pandanus as their weapon for the battle and a rattan woven shield for protection. The duel is accompanied by gamelan music named Seloding, a musical instrument that should only be played by people who purified.

Mekare-kare is carried out by the youth of Tenganan village and also another youth outside the Tenganan village. The youth of the village acts as Pandan War participants, while youths from outside the village as a supporting participant. Though it is not an actual war, it does involve blood, but the spiritual aspect of the ritual causes no men to feel any serious pain, nor do they get infected by the wound resulting from the end of the ritual.

The ceremony begins after the praying ritual at the temple and continues with circling around the village and drinking traditional fermented drink called “tuak”.

After the battle ends, they smear the scratches and wounds with turmeric and vinegar traditional potion to each other and the ritual leader spreads holy water to them. No heart feeling among the fighters, and they all sit together to feast on banana leaves (megibung) and laugh together at the end.

Visiting the Sasak’s Traditional Village in Lombok

Visiting the Sasak’s Traditional Village in Lombok

Visiting the Sasak’s
Traditional Village in Lombok

Sade traditional village in Rembitan, Central Lombok, is positively the best place to get the vibe of Sasaknese, the indigenous community of Lombok island, West Nusa Tenggara. In fact, 700 Sasaknese residing in the village, all of them are strongly working together to keep the culture and tradition alive.

Sade traditional village in Rembitan, Central Lombok, is positively the best place to get the vibe of Sasaknese, the indigenous community of Lombok island, West Nusa Tenggara. In fact, 700 Sasaknese residing in the village, all of them are strongly working together to keep the culture and tradition alive.

Sade Village contains 150 houses built in the traditional Sasak style called Bale Tani with wooden frames, woven-bamboo walls, soil floor and dried grass roof. The uniqueness of this traditional house lies on the floor that uses wet cow or buffalo dung to mop – aim to keep the warmth and repel flies and mosquitos. However, after it dried, it didn’t smell dung at all. This often surprises many tourists.

Another distinct feature of Sade Village is the bonnet-shaped rice barn (granary) known as “lumbungan”. The Sasak people store their paddies in the “lumbungan”, which is usually shared between 5 – 6 families.

All Sasaknese women are taught to weave from a young age. They said that a girl cannot marry if she doesn’t know how to weave. Their traditional woven cloth, Tenun Ikat, is made through intensive process. The whole process of dyeing and weaving can take months to finish a high-quality product.

Visitors can buy the clothes at the homes that are converted into storefronts for Sasak fabrics like ikat (a colorful rainbow cloth using traditional patterns) and songket (cloth with gold and silver threads woven throughout). The ladies also sell products made from their clothing, including bags, hats, bands and table runners.

As visitors come, a group of young Sasaknese stand on the main entrance to welcome them, smiling and offering services to tour the village. Visitors can also enjoy some cultural performances in the village. Those cultural performances are:

In the past, Tarian Gendang Beleq (Big Drum) was performed on important occasions. Particularly, to accompany soldiers to and from the battlefield. Today, the Sasak performs Gendang Belek during traditional ceremonies such as “Merariq” (marriage ceremony), “Sunatan” (circumcision ceremony) and “Ngurisang” (aqiqah).

The Petuk dance is performed during circumcision of boys around 7 – 12 years of age. In Lombok, the circumcision ceremony is celebrated as lavishly as a marriage ceremony. Peresean dance is a ritual fake fight between two warriors with sticks and shields. It symbolizes the manhood of the Sasak men. Amaq Tempengus dance where a man heavily draped in a funny dress danced to the music and recited dialogues in Sasak language.

Sasak Sade Village is one of the living museums of Lombok’s indigenous art, culture & traditions. Here, its people live their ways of life in the customs that they have grown up with.

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Pictures from : https://matta-tour.com/site/2017/09/28/visiting-the-sasaks-traditional-village-in-lombok/

Laweyan & Kauman:The Oldest Batik Villages in Solo

Laweyan & Kauman:The Oldest Batik Villages in Solo

Laweyan & Kauman:
The Oldest Batik Villages in Solo

Surakarta, or commonly called Solo, is one of the most famous batik central in Indonesia. Two famous Batik villages in Solo that having long history of Batik, Laweyan Batik Village and Kauman Batik Village offer you a lot to admire.

Surakarta, or commonly called Solo, is one of the most famous batik central in Indonesia. Batik Solo has unique and specific traditional pattern through the process of “Batik Cap (stamped) and Batik Tulis (hand-drawn)”. There are two famous Batik villages in Solo that having long history of Batik, Laweyan Batik Village and Kauman Batik Village. Both now are designed as cultural villages, batik center & workshop, and tourist destinations.

The first difference between Laweyan and Kauman is the Batik pattern. Laweyan Batik Village has hundreds of modern batik patterns and it’s known to use bright color, while Kauman Batik Village has classic motifs and mostly use dark color such as dark brown.

Laweyan

The Laweyan Batik Village is Solo’s oldest and most famous Batik village, after the Kauman Village. The village is located at the heart of Solo with various heritage buildings that have a unique blend of Javanese, European, Chinese and Islamic architectural features surrounded by tall fences. Laweyan has been existed since the Kingdom of Pajang (15681-1586), the first Islamic kingdom in Java.

Walk through Laweyan’s narrow alleys, you’ll found the houses of batik makers. The old buildings are revived not only as residences, but also as batik production houses and galleries. Batik has become the main livelihood of most of the 2, 500 residents here who are either employed in the manufacturing or selling.

Motif Jarik (long cloth usually worn by woman as traditional dress) with Truntun and Tirto Tejo motifs are the main characteristic of batik Laweyan. Laweyan’s Batik has lighter color compared to Kauman’s that has dark color and classic motif. Now, Laweyan has 250 motifs of batik which already patented.

Kauman

Kauman, located not far from Jl. Slamet Riyadi, has maintained the tradition because of the many Abdi Dalem (royal servant) batik makers of the Kraton Surakarta/Solo (Sultanate Palace) living in the district. Kauman also has historical architectures such as the Joglo mansions, Limasan houses, colonial buildings and Javanese-Dutch architectures.

In earlier time, Kauman Batik Village became Abdi Dalem’s settlement who maintaining the tradition by making Batik. Different from Laweyan, Kauman’s Batik has classic motif with silk materials that represents Kasunanan Palace’s Batik.

Nowadays, Kauman’s Batik has 3 types of motif, there are classic Batik Tulis (hand-drawn batik) which become favorite product, Batik Cap (stamped) and combination of classic and stamp batik which use dark color.

Not just shopping and admiring batik patterns in Laweyan and Kauman, if you’re interested, you can follow short course of making Batik or if you want to explore the techniques of making handmade Batik Tulis and Batik Cap you can follow intensive workshop program. You can also experience drawing pattern with canting (pen for drawing Batik motif) or stamping batik with your own hand.